First of all, thank you all for your comments on the last post! I decided not to respond on that post because it was really about hearing others’ opinions, and I did not want to impose my own.

I will, however, proceed to do that now. 😉 Thank you for humoring me!

Like a few of you said, I absolutely agree that patients/clients should have input as far as whether or not they know their weight. And, I acknowledge that this can be a challenge, especially with patients who are having trouble separating what is best for them and what is best for the eating disorder. When I had my intake with my current nutritionist, we went to the scale, and she just said something like, “We do blind weight here.” It wasn’t presented as a choice, though obviously if I had protested, we could have discussed it (I know that she lets others see their weight because not knowing triggers them). But, I didn’t protest because I was RELIEVED. I know that she if she had presented seeing my weight as a choice, I would have chosen to see it. My motives in seeing would have been driven by the e.d., as I know that I do better with blind weights. But, at that time, I didn’t have control over the e.d.; I would have looked because that’s what Ed wanted. I needed her to take control over Ed by making the decision to do blind weight, because I was not capable of doing so at the time.

I think that, for patients in the later stages of recovery, the decision about whether or not they see their weight should be made in collaboration with their treatment team. I fail to see how wrestling control and agency away from a patient in this area would be helpful to recovery. So, if a patient wants to know her/his weight, and if the treatment team agrees that it is for recovery-positive reasons, I absolutely think that the patient’s weight should not be kept from her/him.

That said, I also think that a patient should not be forced to see her/his weight. This recently happened to a friend of mine, which is what inspired this post, and it was incredibly detrimental to her, and bolstered her e.d. And I actually think that it’s quite possible to go for a very long period of time without knowing one’s weight. I went for a period of years without knowing, and now, unless I let myself look at a GP appointment, I don’t know what it is. If a patient chooses to continue with blind weights, yes, it will take a bit of a commitment to maintain that outside of the treatment center – they will have to ask to skip being weighed or be weighed backwards at Dr. appointments, they will have to commit to not buying a scale, etc. – but it really is very do-able. And there are other ways to gauge one’s weight that allow a bit more for natural fluctuations in weight – how one’s clothing fits, for example. I think we confront the reality of our weight and/or changing weight everyday, whether or not we label it with a number. And I think that, for someone who continues to choose blind weight, if she/he does encounter a number unexpectedly (on a doctor’s chart, for example), if treatment has been truly effective, she/he will be able to cope productively.

Personally, I’m glad that my team enforced blind weight when i needed them to, and I am glad I’m able to choose to continue with it. AND, I’m glad that for other people, they us different methods – one’s that are more effective. I guess this goes back to my firm belief that, generally speaking, e.d. treatment – including whether or not patients know their weight – needs to be about the individual, rather than about blanket policies.

 

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